Comments: Introducing the new HavenCo location...

since you asked the question :), having lived with the site of mt. umunhum for many years ...

could be seen from all over the valley, the radar is gone, but the support building can still be seen.
http://www.pbase.com/bryan_murahashi/image/55468656

This radar site was in operation from 1958-1970; there was a huge 85-ton AN/FPS-24 radar installation located at the radar site. The building remains still standing at the 3,486 foot summit of Mt. Umunhum are a relic of the Cold War.

more views
http://www.radomes.org/museum/recent/AlmadenAFSCA.html

a tale of some early stanford sail computer "teething" problems
http://www-db.stanford.edu/pub/voy/museum/pictures/AIlab/SailFarewell.html

I got proper air conditioning a short time later, but unfortunately developed a bad case of hiccups that struck regularly at 12 second intervals. My assistants spent a number of days trying to find the cause of this mysterious malady without success. As luck would have it, somebody brought a portable radio into my room one day and noticed that it was emitting a "Bzz" at regular intervals -- in fact, at the same moment that I hicced. Further investigation revealed that the high-powered air defense radar atop Mt. Umunhum, about 20 miles away, was causing some of my transistors to act as radio receivers. We solved this problem by improving my grounding.

... snip ..

couldn't find any pictures of mt umunhum with the radar still in place ... but here are some pages with an/fps-24 including one with dome.
http://www.radomes.org/museum/equip/fps-24.html

another an/fps-24 page
http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/airdef/an-fps-24.htm

trying to find some comparison to x-band dome
http://www.fas.org/spp/starwars/program/gbr.htm

the relative size of the buildings and by comparison the dome, would seem to indicate the an/fps-24 dome was larger than the x-band dome?

Posted by Lynn Wheeler at September 6, 2006 10:47 PM

The old cyber on top of the UNSW library building did exactly that - fail 12 or so seconds after boot. The problem was eventually tracked down to the airport radar maybe 10km away. The solution was huge vertical slats surrounding the top floor which many people thought were an architectural feature.

In a former life I did the planning for an ISP in the Caribbean that had to survive and keep operating during hurricanes. Radomes are one way to keep your satellite connections up, but they become by far the most expensive component, with price rising up by the cube or square of the size of the dish.

Posted by Iang at September 7, 2006 06:31 AM
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